Catching Yakkas from the Shore along the Eastern Coast of Australia

Learn how to catch yakkas from the shore along the eastern coast of Australia with our comprehensive guide. Discover the best gear and techniques for catching these hard-fighting fish and learn how to use them as live bait. Get all the tips and tricks you need to improve your yakka-catching game today!

Catching Yakkas from the Shore along the Eastern Coast of Australia

Catching Yakkas from the Shore along the Eastern Coast of Australia

Are you looking to catch yakkas, also called yellowtail scad, from the shore along the eastern coast of Australia? If so, you’ve come to the right place! In this article we’ll take a deep dive into the world of yakkas and provide you with all the information you need to catch them successfully.

Understanding Yakkas

Before we dive into the techniques and gear required to catch yakkas let’s first take a closer look at these fish. Yakkas are schooling fish that are typically found in large numbers along the eastern coast of Australia. They are known for their hard-fighting nature which makes them a popular target for anglers of all levels.

Physical Description

Yakkas are small silver fish with a distinctive yellow stripe down the length of their body. They have a forked tail and a relatively small mouth which means they are typically caught on small hooks or lures. They are most commonly seen from 10 to 20 cm in length but get over 30cm at maturity.

Habitat and Distribution

Yakkas are found in most coastal waters along the eastern coast of Australia from Queensland down to Victoria. They are commonly found around rocky reefs, piers, and jetties, and tend to school in large numbers.

Behaviour and Feeding Habits

Yakkas are opportunistic feeders and will eat a variety of small fish and crustaceans. They tend to feed near the surface of the water making them an ideal target for shore-based anglers.

Fishing Gear and Techniques

To catch yakkas from the shore you’ll need the right gear and techniques. There are a few key things to keep in mind when fishing for yakkas.

Rod and Reel Setup

When fishing for yakkas it’s best to use a light to medium-weight rod and reel setup. A 7-foot rod with medium action and a 2500-4000 size spinning reel is ideal for this type of fishing.

Lures and Baits

Small metal jigs and soft plastic lures work for attracting yakkas. If using bait bread on a small size 8 or 10 hook under a float will work. Prawn its will also work but will also attract a multitude of other fish like sweep. A sabiki rig can be very effective when cast and retrieved or jigged. Another popular bait for yakkas is canned tuna which can be mixed with bread to create an irresistible scent trail.

Sabiki Rigs

Sabiki rigs are a popular choice for catching yakkas particularly when fishing around piers and jetties. These rigs consist of a length of line with several small hooks, or flies, attached to it. The rig is typically weighted with a sinker on the bottom to help it sink quickly and keep it in the strike zone. Sabiki rigs can also be used under a slip float which allows you to jig the rig back towards you and potentially attract more yakkas.

Burley Trail

Using burley can be an effective way to attract yakkas to your fishing spot. One popular burley mixture is a combination of bread mixed with tuna oil or canned tuna. This scent trail will lure the fish closer to your hook making them more likely to take your bait. Soak whatever bread you have or can find cheap and add seawater to make a porridge like mixture. Throw out handfuls regularly to bring in fish. Don’t throw out large chunks as you want to attract fish not feed them.

Tips for Catching More Yakkas

To increase your chances of catching more yakkas, here are a few additional tips to keep in mind:

  • Fish during early morning or late afternoon when yakkas are most active
  • Cast your line near structure like piers and jetties where yakkas like to congregate
  • Vary your retrieve speed to mimic the movement of small baitfish
  • Keep your bait or lure in the strike zone for as long as possible to maximize your chances of a bite

Live Bait and Preparation

Yakkas make excellent live bait for various larger fish including kingfish. To keep yakkas alive and healthy it’s best to keep them in a bucket of seawater with an aerator or by frequently changing out the water. Once you’re ready to use them as bait simply hook them through the back or through the lips and cast them out.

If you prefer to eat yakkas they can be filleted and cooked in a variety of ways. One popular method is to pan-fry them with a little oil, garlic, and lemon juice. Yakkas are also great for fish cakes or fish tacos. Yakkas can be cleaned quickly by filetting the fish whole and then taking the skin off the same way it was filetted. It is a quick process if you are at all handy with a filet knife.

Conclusion

Catching yakkas from the shore along the eastern coast of Australia can be a fun and rewarding experience for anglers of all levels. Using the right gear and techniques and keeping a few essential tips in mind can increase your chances of a successful catch. So grab your rod and reel, head to your nearest pier or jetty, and see if you can catch yourself some yakkas today!

FAQs

  1. What is the best time of day to catch yakkas from the shore?
  2. What type of bait works best for catching yakkas?
  3. Can yakkas be used as live bait for larger fish?
  4. What is a sabiki rig and how is it used to catch yakkas?
  5. Can yakkas be eaten and if so, what is the best way to prepare them?

FAQ Answers

  1. The best time of day to catch yakkas from the shore is typically early morning or late afternoon when they are most active and feeding.
  2. Bread, canned tuna, and small metal jigs or soft plastic lures all work well for catching yakkas. Sabiki rigs and small hooks under a float can also be effective.
  3. Yes, yakkas make excellent live bait for larger fish like kingfish. They can be hooked through the back or the lips and cast out to attract bigger fish.
  4. A sabiki rig is a length of line with several small hooks, or flies, attached to it. The rig is typically weighted with a sinker on the bottom to help it sink quickly and keep it in the strike zone. Sabiki rigs can be used under a float or jigged back towards you to attract yakkas.
  5. Yes, yakkas can be eaten and are commonly used in a variety of dishes like fish cakes or fish tacos. They can be filleted and pan-fried with a little oil, garlic, and lemon juice for a delicious and healthy meal.

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